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Wonderful Places to Visit in Germany for a Surreal Experience

If you’re trying to find a place that’s abundant with markings of the past, then Germany’s the place for you. As you might know, Germany was an essential player in the past world wars. Hence, it filled Germany with monoliths to the stories of our grandpas about times of the past which are always remembered.

Berlin Wall

There’s no other place in Germany that’s more suffused with charged up feelings than the Berlin Wall. You can just envision the tears and the blood shed over this very wall. The wounds of the wars stand as one of the best monoliths to democracy known to men – a sign that liberty will always come out triumphant.

The Romantic Road

Driving through the Romantic road would be among the most enjoyable drives you’ll experience in your entire life. This roadway is flanked by beautiful landscapes on both sides. Periodically, you’ll go through an attractive town, a stunning gothic church, and in some cases, a charming countryside inn.

Augsburg

Going through the Romantic Road will lead you to Augsburg, a town established by the Roman Legions and called after the renowned Roman emperor, Augustus. This stunning town includes such historic locations as St. Anne’s Church, the place where Martin Luther took sanctuary, and Dom, a very uncommon Cathedral. You can also find here the Renaissance Golden Room, a sight that will make you squint with its shine.

Neuschwanstein Castle

Did you know that Walt Disney used a castle found in Germany as his motivation for the castle of Sleeping Beauty? It’s real, those alabaster walls and those high towers and large parapets were all based upon the Neuschwanstein Castle. It is now hailed as one of the most popular tourist areas in Germany.

The Castles of Fussen

Like the majority of Europe, numerous castles are scattered throughout Germany. It consists of the other 2 of Ludwig’s castles, the very first one being the Neuschwanstein Castle. This is a must-see for all those families who are taking a trip through Germany because the place actually appears like it’s been torn from a storybook.

Lake Constance

Lake Constance is both a tourist area and a necessary source of life for the Germans. Numerous locations in the nation depend on this very lake for their drinking water, and this big lake is also a terrific place to swim and to go bird watching. Certainly, if you’re one for stunning natural landscapes, then Lake Constance is not to be disregarded.

The Black Forest

The name appears like it has been drawn from among the fairy tales. The Black Forest – it seems like a place where wicked witches live and cursed trees grow, but do not let that scare you however. If anything, the Black Forest can barely be associated with its name as it’s a warm forest. It’s a terrific place to go treking and a fantastic place for picnics.

Perfume

When you hear the word, Cologne, what enters your mind? A lovely scent, right? Well, meet the town that’s called Cologne for a reason and certainly, the town of Cologne has its own strange scent that’s very pleasing to the nose. Also, there you will find a lovely view of the River Rhine and the Cologne Cathedral.

Dachau

Take a break from the fairy tale castles and magical forests and go to the place called Dachau. Dachau is a prisoner-of-war camp – a mark of Germany’s dark past where you can just envision the tragedy that happened in this very area. You will also find a statue bearing the engraving, “Never Again”, a solemn guarantee of the German people that they will ‘never ever once again’ devote such offensive acts – another real success for peace.

Oktoberfest

The Oktoberfest – technically, it’s not a place, but it’s too great a celebration to omit in any list about Germany. This exciting celebration in the town of Bavaria is ensured to leave you inebriated and blissful.

Traveling or even staying in Germany means you have access to some great historical places and events.

Germany may be a different country when it comes to culture and living ways, its uniqueness will, however, make it fun to live.

Learn the Driving Dynamics in Germany – Before you Go

Germany is the last frontier for car enthusiasts and people who love to drive. It is the only nation without a speed limit that has well-paved, smooth roadways. But if you are not familiar with the roadway signs or guidelines of the roadway, German driving can be demanding, exhausting and unsafe. Before you drive in Germany, be sure you recognize the distinctions in guidelines and signs for you to have a fantastic experience.

German driving license

Germans are not eligible to drive up until they are 18 then they need to take extensive driving tests in order to get their license. Fortunately, a US license is recognized in Germany for as much as 6 months. If you are going to Germany you do not need to get a different, global license, though it is suggested.

Speed Limits

Not all German roadways lack speed limits. In the cities, towns and parts of the Autobahn it is not safe to drive too fast. These roadways will have a speed limit posted on a round sign with a red external ring and the speed limit in the middle. Typical speed limits are 50 kph in the populated area or city limits, 30 kph in property or business zones, 100 kph on back roads in between cities and towns, and 120 kph on hazardous or busy areas of the Autobahn. At the end of a speed limit zone will be the same round sign, grey and white this time, with the speed limit slashed out. Then you are free to go as quickly as you would like on the Autobahn or approximately 100 kph on non-Autobahn roadways in between towns.

Right Before Left

There are a lot less crossways with stop signs or red light in Germany compared to the US. A fundamental guideline is followed, where there are no signs the guideline is ideal before left. When driving through smaller sized towns or narrower city roadways you will come across many right before left driving circumstances. Ensure you slow down enough when getting in the crossway to stop if somebody is on your right. The exception is if you are on a top priority road.

Priority Roads

Germans have a great deal of Priority roadways. A top priority roadway is known by a yellow, diamond formed sign. These are typically primary or well used roadways within towns and cities. If you are getting in a crossway or there is a roadway on your right, and if there is a priority roadway sign that means that you have the right-of-way and the other motorist should wait for you.

Round-a-Bouts

There are many round-a-bouts in Germany. Most are one lane, but there are some with 2 or more lanes. Round-a-bouts are easy to find. Individuals currently in the circle have the access. You can into the circle when there is an opening. You do not need to signal your coming into the round-a-bout. As you leave the round-a-bout, signal your turn out. They are fantastic to keep traffic moving through a crossway.

Traffic Lanes

In general, it is best to keep right. On the Autobahn you are not allowed to hand down the right of way. Because of high speeds, it is particularly essential to remain on the right if you are slower. When you do need to pass somebody, make certain that you have enough space to get around the car in time. When in the left lane, you must be looking at your back more than your front. Cars can turn up quickly behind you and flash their lights to get you to move. It is very dangerous so always watch your back when you are driving on the left lane of the Autobahn.

Do Not Do This on the Autobahn

When driving on the autobahn, no not make a u-turn, stop or park unless on a designated park place, run out of gas, drive in the left lane to obstruct other vehicles, tailgate or flash your headlights (though people do it anyhow), or leave your vehicle within a traffic congestion.

Right Turn on Red

In some states in the US you can turn right at a traffic signal. In Germany, unless it is marked by a unique green arrow sign beside the traffic signal you cannot turn right on red.

Phone and Driving

Mobile phone use is unlawful while driving in Germany. Bring a headset or ask your “co-pilot” to address the phone for you.

Mishaps

Nobody desires a mishap to happen, specifically in a foreign nation. If it does happen though, here are a couple of actions to take.

  • Do not leave the scene
  • Then make certain your emergency blinkers are on and establish your emergency triangle far enough behind your car to alert other motorists. The emergency triangle will be found in the trunk of your car, most likely attached to the trunk hood.
  • Then call the German cops who will also be able to send out an ambulance. The German cops number is 110.
  • Help the hurt if needed and wait on help.
  • Make certain you do not confess any fault or you might surrender your insurance protection.

After the cops and emergency situation vehicles arrive they might asses an on-the-spot fine and will let you know the next actions you need to take.

Speed Traps

Lastly, there are a number of speed traps in cities and on the autobahns. The Germans have many high-speed electronic cameras established on unsafe curves or traffic control. These electronic cameras flash and take your photo (consisting of license plate) if you are surpassing the speed limit or run a traffic signal. Anticipate a substantial fine and possible suspension of your license if you get captured.

All in all, driving in German is a fantastic experience. The guidelines are a bit different compared with the US, but lots of people find driving in Germany less demanding, more organized, and very satisfying. If you follow the guidelines, acquaint yourself with the signs, you will have a wonderful driving experience in Germany.

Smoothly Relocate to Germany – Here are Essential Tips

Have you ever considered moving overseas? In moving to an overseas country, Germany for instance, you must be asking questions like – Is it simple? What do I bring? How should I act?

Using my own experience in transferring to Germany, I give you these 10 tips to address these Prioritys. Consisting of suggestions regarding what you will need to do before leaving your country and as soon as you show up in the wonderful Germany.

Residence Permit (visa) versus Tourist Visa

The first question you must ask yourself is the length of time do you wish to remain in Germany: is it a brief stay? Less than 3 months? Or a rather long one? If you chose to stay more than 3 months, then you will need a home license (visa). A tourist visa is valid just for 3 months.

How to get the Residence Permit

Upon arriving, you have 3 months to get your home authorization. The files you will need are the following:

– Legitimate passport, one per person – evidence that you belong to live – evidence that you can support yourself and your family (if relevant) economically -evidence of medical insurance -evidence of marital relationship (if appropriate) – Medelschein -at some point, birth certificate (specifically for the kids) -family pet’s passport and vaccine certificate

Have these files with you on your arrival; DON’T load them in a travel suitcase or in a box “someplace”.

What is the Medelschein?

It is a file that shows that you are registered with the municipal government. You need to go to the town hall of your home to get it. It is very simple and quick to get: you’ll need your passport and an evidence of where you stay. You need to bring this file along when requesting for a house license.

What to bring

If you are transferring to Germany for many months, you will no doubt wish to bring clothes and other personal products with you. Generally, bring with you what you think will be hard to find overseas (such as peanut butter and maple syrup!). But keep in mind, Germany is a very civilized nation and being more or less in the center of Europe, it is very simple to go from there to practically anywhere else on the continent!

Also, consider that it will take weeks for your possessions to show up if you deliver them overseas. So, it is much better to deliver them ahead of time and keep a great amount of clothes and needed products to bring with you on your flight.

Learning some German

Before leaving your country, you may wish to learn a little German. Certainly, it is NOT in our experience that English is being spoken all over Germany or in the rest of Europe for that matter. On the contrary, beyond huge touristic cities such as Frankfurt and Berlin, only a couple of people do speak it. They may understand it, but with limits.

German culture

While learning the language, why not search for more info about the country and its culture? Germans, like everybody else, have their own way of doing things and it would make it simpler on you to know a bit about them before coming.

Your new house in Germany

What are you searching for? A house? A condominium? A home?

In the city? Or in the country side? Always remember that in Germany, public transportation is very effective and is available almost everywhere, even in towns. Real estate outside huge cities is more economical.

You may wish to start looking before coming, as jobs are limited to European cities in general. There are many firms that can help you find a place to stay, but they do charge a cost to the owner in addition to the renter.

Another essential point about is real estate furnished versus unfurnished. You see, in Germany they actually mean unfurnished. That is: there is no furniture of any kind. Not even a tub or a toilet sometimes and definitely no kitchen area closets and counters.

Bank

As you cannot pay your expenses with checks (they do not accept checks anywhere), you will need to open a savings account to move money from this account to the businesses from which you purchase services. It is reasonably simple and easy.

Pets

Although there is not a quarantine need when bringing your animal to Europe, there are particular guidelines to follow.

Your canine or feline must have had its vaccines for rabies at least 30 days before departure and NO more than 12 months before going into Germany. You will obviously need evidence of all vaccinations, to be provided at the time on your arrival. So, it is best to have them with you at all the time throughout the journey. Another crucial point: Pets in Europe should now have a recognition number, either as a tattoo that can be quickly seen or as a microchip and their own passport released by a veterinarian.

Shops and business hours

Most shops are closed from Saturday afternoon 1 or 2 p.m., up until Monday early morning in Germany. So, if you show up on a Saturday, you may need to eat at dining establishments for the next 2 days.

When you have decided to move to Germany, you need to understand at first hand that the country has a very different culture and their laws are a bit different to western countries like the US too. Having a smooth transition in Germany means a lot of effort and patience. Don’t get me wrong thought, it will all surely be worth it.